Coal Slurry Injections, Illinois

Crown #3 Mine

The owner/operator of the Crown #3 mine was given by permission by Illinois regulators to inject coal slurry into the ground, despite the protests of citizens. Coal slurry is a byproduct of washing coal, and can contain arsenic, heavy metals, and other pollutants. In 2009, the Illinois Department of Natural Resources approved a request by Crown 3 owners to start injecting slurry in a different location. Permission at Crown 3 came in the form of an “insignificant permit revision,” meaning that a hearing and public notification weren’t required. The Illinois Environmental Protection Agency (IEPA) categorizes slurry injection wells as the sort used to get rid of non-hazardous waste, and no IEPA permit is required before operations begin. See “Activists raise concerns about coal mine slurry injection in Illinois” July 18, 2010.

Shay #1 Mine

In 2009, Cline’s Macoupin Energy told the Department of Natural Resources that it expects to generate 750,000 tons of coal slurry a year at full production at Shay Mine 1, and asked for permission to inject the waste into the ground. Coal slurry is a byproduct of washing coal, and can contain arsenic, heavy metals, and other pollutants. Millions of gallons of slurry from past mining operations are already onsite at the mine, contained in a massive impoundment with walls more than 700 feet high. The mine owner made the request as a proposed insignificant permit revision, meaning no hearing or public notification would be required. The request is pending.The Illinois Environmental Protection Agency (IEPA) categorizes slurry injection wells as the sort used to get rid of non-hazardous waste, and thus no IEPA permit is required before operations begin.  See “Activists raise concerns about coal mine slurry injection in Illinois” July 18, 2010

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